Schumer Battles AZ Immigration Law Author

On the day before Arizona's controversial immigration law makes its case before the nation's highest court, Sen. Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) faced off with the law's author, former Arizona State Senate President Russell Pearce, and made plans to introduce a bill that would curb the state law's authority.

On the day before Arizona’s controversial immigration law makes its case before the nation’s highest court, Sen. Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) faced off with the law’s author, former Arizona State Senate President Russell Pearce, and announced plans to introduce legislation that would curb the state law’s authority.

During a Senate Judiciary immigration subcommittee hearing, Schumer grilled Pearce for the inclusion of the word “dress” as a characteristic used by Arizona police officers to flag suspicious people after they’ve been pulled over.

What does an illegal immigrant dress like?” Schumer demanded of Pearce.

Schumer continued to press the former Arizona state official by asking about a separate provision in the law that would allow citizens to file lawsuits against Arizona law enforcement if they’re believed to be independently refusing to uphold the law.

“Isn’t that demeaning to police officers? Won’t that push them to do things to protect themselves from lawsuits that the believe they shouldn’t do?” Schumer asked.

Pearce, on the other hand, answered vaguely by saying the guidelines that officers are required to adhere to were carefully constructed by law enforcement and U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials. Pearce then shot back at Schumer, accusing him of failing to trust local law enforcement.

“I think it’s demeaning to law enforcement to assume they don’t know how to do their jobs,” Pearce said. “I get a little disappointed that we’re the bad guys for enforcing the law… I think Americans are tired of the drive-by statements from politicians.”

Schumer unveiled the details of a Senate Democratic measure meant to be employed if the Supreme Court upholds the law. Though Schumer said he hopes the Supreme Court will strike down the controversial state law, his back up plan is legislation that would prohibit states from implementing anti-immigration measures without the direct cooperation of federal officials.

The Supreme Court is scheduled to hear oral arguments over S.B. 1070. Pearce said he believes that law will be upheld, 5-3, given that Justice Elena Kagan recuses herself.

Tags:

Benny Martinez
Benny Martinez is a Capitol Hill Correspondent for TRNS. Follow Benny on Twitter @BennyJMartinez

New Clinton Memoir Titled “Hard Choices”

The memoir is set to be released on June 14th.

Report: Sebelius Not Considering Senate Run

Rumors emerged earlier this week that the Sebelius could enter the race against Sen. Pat Roberts (R-Ks.).

More Details Emerge Of Political Misuse Of The IRS

New facts are emerging, telling us how extensively the IRS has been misused by the Obama Administration for political purposes.

TRNS News Notes- Friday, April 18

Obama: “glimmer of hope” on Ukraine
Kerry: Ukraine anti-Semitism “grotesque”
Putin speaks: won’t rule out troops
Snowden asks Putin spy question
South Korea ferry: desperate messages

Click here for: Friday, April 18

● Reporters ask reversal of You Tube order

● Equal time for atheists

● Limited progress against foodborne infections

● 2013 federal tax season ends

● Dramatic decline in domestic violence

● 5.1 million have security clearances

CBO: Obama’s Budget Proposal Would Add $6.6 Trillion To Deficit

The agency says that the budget would add $1.7 trillion more to the deficit than the White House initially predicted.