Grassley: Video Games Big Part Of Gun Problem

The top Republican on the Senate Judiciary Committee declared that "there are too many video games that celebrate the mass killing of innocent people—games that despite attempts at industry self-regulation find their way into the hands of children."
Photo/TRNS

Photo/TRNS

Sen. Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa) said during a Senate hearing on gun violence today that violent video games must be examined as part of a broad plan to curb gun violence.

The top Republican on the Senate Judiciary Committee declared that “there are too many video games that celebrate the mass killing of innocent people—games that despite attempts at industry self-regulation find their way into the hands of children.”

Specifically, Grassley singled out the game Call of Duty, which he noted “was for foreign distribution because the opening level depicted shooting innocent civilians in an airport security line.”

“This game was specifically cited in the manifesto of the Norway mass shooter as “part of my training-simulation” for carrying out the attacks,” Grassley said. “Where is the artistic value in shooting innocent civilians?”

In his statement, Grassley cautioned against banning guns, and questioned “why only now?” after the massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary in Newtown, Connecticut did President Obama issue an executive order allowing the Centers for Disease Control to research the causes of gun violence.

“Had Congress actually prohibited gun violence research,” Grassley argued, “the President could not legally have directed CDC to conduct that research.”

Check back later for a full recap of the hearing, which featured testimony from Mark Kelly, the husband of former Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords (D-Ariz.), and National Rifle Association CEO Wayne LaPierre.

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Geoff Holtzman
Geoff Holtzman is Talk Radio News Service's Deputy Bureau Chief. As one of TRNS's primary correspondents, he helps cover the White House and Capitol Hill. Geoff also covered the 2012 presidential campaign, following the candidates to Iowa, New Hampshire, South Carolina, North Carolina, Florida and elsewhere. In the process, he learned that not all Motel 6's are created equal. Follow Geoff on Twitter @Geoff_Holtzman.

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