U.S. Continues To Help Rebuild The Philippines

“I think that the United States, the UN, and the local organizations really did an outstanding job,” said Catholic Relief Services Chief Operating Officer Sean Callahan in reference to Typhoon Haiyan.
Typhoon Haiyan damage in Leyte, Philippiones, November 2013. Flickr photo: European Commission DG ECHO

Typhoon Haiyan damage in Leyte, Philippiones, November 2013. Flickr photo: European Commission DG ECHO


(TRNS) — At a hearing before the House Subcommittee on Africa, Global Health, Global Human Rights, and International Organizations, witnesses praised the U.S. government’s immediate response to Typhoon Haiyan and focused on future reconstruction efforts.

“I think that the United States, the UN, and the local organizations really did an outstanding job,” said the Chief Operating Officer of Catholic Relief Services Sean Callahan of the response to the typhoon.

Haiyan killed over 5,600 people, injured approximately 26,000, and affected nearly 11 million others when it hit the Philippines on November 8.

Committee Chairman Chris Smith (R-N.J.) shared the devastation he witnessed when he visited the Philippines last week.

“One man told us how his father drowned only a few feet from where we stood and how he had stoically carried many waterlogged dead bodies to a mass grave,” Smith said.

Assistant administrator for Democracy Conflict and Humanitarian Assistance of the US Agency for International Development Nancy Lindborg said the U.S. began working with the Filipino government before the storm even hit and with other organizations to provide the immediate emergency response.

According to Lindborg, the U.S. provided about 2,450 tons of emergency supplies, evacuated 21,000 people, and gave $60,000 in food assistance.

Catholic Relief Services and World Vision also had witnesses at the hearing who testified about the many services they have provided to the people of the Philippines including providing food, water, shelter, healthcare, and focusing on protecting vulnerable individuals.

“We have learned through our many decades of involvement with relief efforts like this that one of our first priorities must be providing a safe place for children,” said the Senior Director of Humanitarian and Emergency Affairs for World Vision U.S. Chris Palusky. “It is urgent to engage and work with vulnerable children and families now to ensure that their desperation does not lead to the exploitation of children in exchange for money, food, or medicine.”

All witnesses stated a commitment to rebuilding in a more resilient way. Witnesses also called on congress to continue to fund recovery efforts and keep the national spotlight on the destruction in the Philippines.

“We see all to often that after the cameras go away that these kinds of responses go away,” said Lindborg. “As the spotlight on the immediate crisis dims, the U.S. government will enhance our support for these vital preparedness, relief, and early recovery efforts.”

“It’s going to be a marathon,” said Palusky as he encouraged Congress to maintain interest in recovery efforts.

DC Bureau Footer

About TRNS Washington Desk

View all posts by TRNS Washington Desk
News updates from on and around Capitol Hill.

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Poll: Trump, Carson, Fiorina Neck-And Neck In CA

Screen Shot 2015-09-16 at 6.31.01 PM

Rubio follows with 10 percent.

French Train Hero Stabbed, In Stable Condition

French President François Hollande pins the Legion of Honor on U.S. Airman 1st Class Spencer Stone during a ceremony at the Élysée in Paris Aug. 24, 2015, following a foiled attack on a French train. Stone was on vacation with his childhood friends, Aleksander Skarlatos and Anthony Sadler, when an armed gunman entered their train carrying an assault rifle, a handgun and a box cutter. The three friends, with the help of a British passenger, subdued the gunman after his rifle jammed. Stone’s medical training prepared him to begin treating wounded passengers while waiting for the authorities to arrive. Stone is an ambulance service technician with the 65th Medical Operations Squadron stationed at Lajes Field, Azores. (U.S. Air Force photo/Tech. Sgt. Ryan Crane)

Stone was one of three Americans that stepped in and physically restrained a man who was intent on causing a mass shooting aboard the train.

Report: Clinton Server Faced Foreign Hacking Attempts

Hacking attempts emerged from China, South Korea and Germany.

TRNS News Notes- 10/8

Obama apologizes for Afghan hospital attack
Iran’s role in Russia’s Syria campaign
Murdoch: Carson “real black president”
Dems fail to shut down House Benghazi committee
Senate Dems ready sweeping guns bill

The World in 2:00 – October 8, 2015

The World in 2:00

China’s Tu Youyou is awarded the Nobel Prize in Medicine for her 1972 discovery of Artemisinin, the Malaria treatment that’s saved millions of lives.

Thursday, October 8

● CFPB opens rulemaking on arbitration clauses

● What’s cooking at the House Agriculture Committee?

● Cooperatives post record income

● Card security hinges on PIN number

● A park by any other name is still a park

● How will man live on Mars?