Young Voters May Stay Home This November

A new poll suggests that young voters may head to the polls this November in smaller numbers than their older counterparts.

A new poll suggests that young voters may head to the polls this November in smaller numbers than their older counterparts.

According to Gallup, only 56 percent of voters between 18 and 30 said that the “definitely” will vote. Among 30-49 year olds, 50 to 64 year olds and those other 65, that number is 80, 81 and 86 percent respectively.

In addition, fewer voters under 30, 60 percent, say that they are registered, a sharp contrast to the 75, 85 and 92 percent registration rates among the three other demographics.

Despite signaling that they’ll be voting in smaller numbers, 64 to 29 percent of young voters say they support Obama over Romney.

The youth vote has taken on special significance this week. In an effort to prompt Congress to prevent an interest hike for federal student loan recipients, President Obama has traveled to several colleges. As for Romney, he has attempted to draw in the youth vote by highlighting economic issues facing younger voters, including the high unemployment rate among recent college graduates.

The poll was conducted among 2,165 voters between April 20th and 24th.

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Justin Duckham
Justin Duckham is a Senior Washington Correspondent with the Talk Radio News Service. Justin is a proud alumnus of UC Merced, where he studied History, Philosophy and American Studies. Prior to making the jump to politics in 2008, Justin was a music journalist in California. Follow Justin on Twitter @Jduckham

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