Jack Abramoff Looks For Renewed Status As Watchdog

Former Republican lobbyist and convicted felon Jack Abramoff is taking on a new role inside the beltway as a watchdog working to expose the corruption in politics.

Former Republican lobbyist and convicted felon Jack Abramoff is taking on a new role inside the beltway as a watchdog working to expose the corruption in politics.

Abramoff told an audience Monday at Public Citizen, a non-profit, consumer rights advocacy group based in Washington, D.C., that the term “lobbyist” needs redefining as the act of lobbying has evolved in modern politics.

“Those who engage in public service, those who work on Capitol Hill, those who are elected to federal office, those in the administration shouldn’t be able to move into from those positions into the influence industry,” Abramoff said referring to GOP presidential candidate Newt Gingrich. “”The definition of “lobbyist” in the law probably needs to be looked at.”

In an effort to perhaps curb corruption in politics, Abramoff suggested that term limits for members of Congress and their staffs become a topic of serious conversation in today’s Congress.

“I believe that over time, with the exception of very few incredible saints, most people start slipping into the miasma,” Abramoff said. “Getting people in and out of here is probably not a bad idea.”

Abramoff, who served three and a half years in prison for corruption of public officials, tax evasion and fraud, has emerged a makeshift watchdog. Following the release of his memoir that gave readers an inside perspective of the corruption in politics, Abramoff has now made his debut on Republic Report, a newly-launched blog dedicated to exposing corruption in politic, offering analyses and the occasional breaking report.

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Benny Martinez
Benny Martinez is a Capitol Hill Correspondent for TRNS. Follow Benny on Twitter @BennyJMartinez

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