Human Rights Group Applauds Ecuador’s Move Granting Assange Asylum

The Center for Constitutional Rights (CCR) on Thursday applauded the Ecuadoran government for agreeing to grant Wikileaks founder Julian Assange political asylum.

The Center for Constitutional Rights (CCR) on Thursday applauded the Ecuadoran government for agreeing to grant Wikileaks founder Julian Assange political asylum.

The non-profit organization works to protect rights guaranteed by the U.S. Constitution and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The group also represents Wikileaks and Assange in the United States.

CCR Executive Director Vincent Warren said in a statement that granting asylum to Assange is a “humanitarian act” and argued that the U.N. General Assembly has declared that the act “not be construed as unfriendly by other countries.”

“Ecuador’s action rightly offers protection to a journalist and publisher who faces persecution from the U.S.,” Vincent said in a statement. “It thereby strengthens the global commitment to human rights, including government accountability and freedom of the press. We hope that Assange’s contributions to a robust democratic society are belatedly recognized by the U.S., which prides itself in its commitment to free press.”

Ecuador’s announcement comes on the heels of U.K. threats to enter the Ecuadoran Embassy to arrest Assange. The CCR called the threat a violation of the Vienna Convention.

Below is the Center for Constitutional Rights’ full statement: 

“We applaud Ecuador for granting asylum to Julian Assange. Ecuador’s action rightly offers protection to a journalist and publisher who faces persecution from the U.S. It thereby strengthens the global commitment to human rights, including government accountability and freedom of the press. We hope that Assange’s contributions to a robust democratic society are belatedly recognized by the U.S., which prides itself in its commitment to a free press.

“Granting asylum is a humanitarian act and the UN General Assembly has unanimously declared that it should not be construed as unfriendly by other countries. The U.S., Sweden and the U.K. have adopted and reiterated this very principle many times. It is imperative, therefore, that no diplomatic consequences should befall Ecuador over this decision.

“We are deeply troubled by the reported U.K. threats to storm the Ecuadoran Embassy and arrest Assange, in clear violation of the Vienna Convention’s protection of the inviolability of sovereign embassy properties, and by the menacing police presence outside the embassy. We call on the British government to explicitly and immediately confirm that it will honor international and diplomatic commitments.”

About TRNS Washington Desk

View all posts by TRNS Washington Desk
TRNS Washington Desk
News updates from on and around Capitol Hill.

LISTEN: The Weekend Ahead – October 25-27

The Day Ahead Logo

Elections in Tunisia and Brazil, and human rights reviews of Iraq, Iran and Egypt.

LISTEN: The World in 2:00 – October 24, 2014

The World in 2:00 continents logo

Ebola spreads to Mali, the Security Council attempts to strengthen Somalia’s arms embargo and a UN expert on immigration says it’s time for holistic reform.

Issa: CDC Chief Bumbled Ebola Response

Members of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee were critical of Centers For Disease Control and the Department of Homeland Security.

NYC Mayor: New York City Fully Prepared to Handle Ebola

NYC Public Advocate Bill de Blasio. Photo/The office of Public Advocate for the City of New York

A doctor who recently returned from Guinea was diagnosed with Ebola on Thursday at a New York City hospital.

Brownstein: Reducing Methane Emissions Helps Job Growth, Economy

Expanding the methane mitigation industry will help with job growth and protect the environment, according to the Chief Counsel of the U.S. Climate and Energy Program.

UN in Brief: Calm & Conflict for October 24, 2014

UN Daily Brief Square

UN staff returning from West Africa to ‘self-monitor’ for Ebola, human rights expert says immigration debate ‘toxic’ and Somali cargo inspections are approved.