Colleges And The Court

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., dreamed that someday we all would be judged by the content of our character, not the color of our skin. 
The Supreme Court may rule that it's time we put Dr. King's goal into action.

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., dreamed that someday we all would be judged by the content of our character, not the color of our skin. 
The Supreme Court may rule that it’s time we put Dr. King’s goal into action.

For decades, colleges admitted minority students even when their grades and test scores were lower than everyone else’s. White students complain that now they’re being discriminated against.

Affirmative action plans were created, supposedly, as temporary measures to help groups who were historically disadvantaged. Now recent history has given them advantages for almost 50 years.

When the Supreme Court last considered race-based college admissions, they let it continue by a one-vote margin. But the makeup of the Court has changed, and now they’ve agreed to consider a case from Texas that may tell colleges it’s time they became color-blind.

From The Heritage Foundation, I’m Ernest Istook.

Ernest Istook
Ernest Istook shares insights from 25 years in public office, including 14 years as a U.S. Congressman, plus raising five children. He now writes for The Washington Times, hosts a talk radio show, and his daily commentaries are heard on over 100 radio stations. To receive Ernest's free newsletter, simply subscribe at http://eepurl.com/JPojD. Ernest also delved into issues as a Distinguished Fellow at The Heritage Foundation and a Fellow at Harvard University's Institute of Politics. As a former news reporter and courtroom attorney, he enjoys gathering and sharing ideas and information in an entertaining way. Follow Ernest on Twitter @Istook and on his website, istook.com.

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Friday, January 30

● 2014 election cost over $3.8 billion

● Super Bowl brings super seizure

● Georgia’s debtor prisons under fire

● Alabama jurist’s advice is worthless

● FOIA suit pierces PATRIOT Act secrecy

● Puerto Rico cops go on a crime spree

LISTEN: The Day Ahead – January 30, 2015

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Ukrainian peace talks kick off in Minsk and African Union leaders gather to discuss plans to confront Boko Haram.

Senate Approves Keystone XL Pipeline

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However, prospects of the Keystone XL pipeline being approved are grim as the White House has already issued a veto threat, and the Senate does not appear to have the 67 votes necessary to override that veto.

Graham Laying Groundwork For Potential 2016 Run

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“What I’m looking at is, is there a pathway forward on the ground in Iowa and New Hampshire for a guy like me? I don’t know until I look,” Graham reportedly told reporters on Thursday.

FCC Votes To Increase Minimum Broadband Internet Speeds

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According to the FCC, more than half of all rural Americans are currently unable to access the updated speeds set forth today, and hopes that this move will fast track that progress.

LISTEN: The World in 2:00 – January 29, 2015

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A new report challenges the economic, environmental and humanitarian case for biofuels.