Colleges And The Court

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., dreamed that someday we all would be judged by the content of our character, not the color of our skin. 
The Supreme Court may rule that it's time we put Dr. King's goal into action.

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., dreamed that someday we all would be judged by the content of our character, not the color of our skin. 
The Supreme Court may rule that it’s time we put Dr. King’s goal into action.

For decades, colleges admitted minority students even when their grades and test scores were lower than everyone else’s. White students complain that now they’re being discriminated against.

Affirmative action plans were created, supposedly, as temporary measures to help groups who were historically disadvantaged. Now recent history has given them advantages for almost 50 years.

When the Supreme Court last considered race-based college admissions, they let it continue by a one-vote margin. But the makeup of the Court has changed, and now they’ve agreed to consider a case from Texas that may tell colleges it’s time they became color-blind.

From The Heritage Foundation, I’m Ernest Istook.

Ernest Istook
Ernest Istook shares insights from 25 years in public office, including 14 years as a U.S. Congressman, plus raising five children. He now writes for The Washington Times, hosts a talk radio show, and his daily commentaries are heard on over 100 radio stations. To receive Ernest's free newsletter, simply subscribe at http://eepurl.com/JPojD. Ernest also delved into issues as a Distinguished Fellow at The Heritage Foundation and a Fellow at Harvard University's Institute of Politics. As a former news reporter and courtroom attorney, he enjoys gathering and sharing ideas and information in an entertaining way. Follow Ernest on Twitter @Istook and on his website, istook.com.

Click here for: Thursday, October 23

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LISTEN: The Day Ahead – October 23, 2014

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LISTEN: The World in 2:00 – October 22, 2014

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