Judge Blocks A Portion Of The NDAA

The highly-controversial indefinite detention provision signed into law by the President at the end of last year has been ruled unconstitutional by a U.S. District court judge in New York. The provision allows the military to detain anyone indefinitely if they are suspected of associating with terrorists – whether they realize it or not.

But that law was challenged by a group of journalists and whistleblowers – including Chris Hedges, Noam Chomsky, and Daniel Ellsberg – who argued the law violated the First Amendment – since journalists often come in contact with terrorist organization and thus under the law could be subject to detention. On Wednesday night, Judge Katherine Forrest agreed with the plaintiffs in the case, ruling that the law is unconstitutional – violating the First Amendment rights of the press and the Fifth Amendment right of due process.

Meanwhile, as a new version of the NDAA is being debated in Congress, brave members on both sides of the aisle are arguing that there should be no indefinite detention provision in it, invalidating the previous NDAA. We need to return to the values our nation was founded on, which include bravery and due process – and not fear and medieval imprisonment techniques.

Thom Hartmann
Thom Hartmann is a progressive nationally and internationally syndicated talkshow host (also simulcast as TV in 40 million homes by Dish Network/Free Speech TV), and New York Times bestselling, four-time Project Censored winning author of 24 books in print in 17 languages on five continents. Follow Thom on Twitter @Thom_Hartmann

Click here for: Tuesday, October 21

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LISTEN: The Day Ahead – October 21, 2014

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More British army medics deploy to Sierra Leone, Ukraine and Russia talk energy in Brussels and the U.N. elects new members to the Human Rights Council.

Smithsonian Board Meeting Disrupted By Staff Seeking Wage Increases

Government employees protested for increased wages at the Smithsonian's annual Board of Regents meeting at the Smithsonian Hirschorn Museum, Oct. 20, 2014. (Photo by James Cullum)

Federal contract workers call for better pay and benefits at the annual Smithsonian Board of Regents meeting on Monday.

LISTEN: The World in 2:00 – October 20, 2014

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The U.S. transports Kurdish weapons to Kobani, disturbing reports of sexual violence in South Sudan and a very dirty Beijing Marathon.

Rubio Plans To Pursue Travel Ban Legislation

Rubio plans to introduce the new legislation in November when the Senate returns to session.

Perez Avoids Avoids Attorney General Questions

Perez tried to steer the focus of inquiries back on his current job as the Secretary of Labor.