Corporations Should Pay For Their Own Mistakes

Just like those responsible for oil spills, these companies are never forced to pay the true cost of their reckless behavior.

Thom HartmannMore than 300,000 West Virginia residents are facing their fifth day of dealing with a massive chemical spill, and FEMA is helping state and local agencies ensure that residents have access to safe drinking water.  That means tax payers are already covering the cost of the spill, and they could also be on the hook for clean up expenses.  To make matters worse, state environmental officials are now saying that the chemical leak could be substantially worse than first believed.  Earlier reports estimated between two and five thousand gallons of a dangerous coal-processing chemical leaked into the Elk River, but now residents are learning that as many as 7,500 gallons could have contaminated their drinking water.

The West Virginian American Water Company says it will likely be “several days” before residents can use their tap water for anything other than flushing toilets.  Many schools and businesses remain closed because of the dangerous spill, and stores can’t keep up with the demand for bottled water.  The West Virginia chemical spill is a perfect example of why corporations aren’t more responsible when dealing with dangerous substances – they keep all the profits, and the public is forced to cover the cost of their mistakes.

Just like those responsible for oil spills, these companies are never forced to pay the true cost of their reckless behavior.  Patricia Mason, a 54-year old retired West Virginia resident, said, “It seems like no one watches these companies.  They get away with this all the time, and we’re the ones who pay for it.  We’re the ones who are suffering.  It’s just wrong.”  Our nation must enact stricter regulations to govern these toxic chemicals, and we need to start holding corporations responsible for the real cost of the damage they do to our environment and our lives.

Thom Hartmann
Thom Hartmann is a progressive nationally and internationally syndicated talkshow host (also simulcast as TV in 40 million homes by Dish Network/Free Speech TV), and New York Times bestselling, four-time Project Censored winning author of 24 books in print in 17 languages on five continents. Follow Thom on Twitter @Thom_Hartmann

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