Too Many Federal Agencies Have Created Their Own Private Armies

Does the Environmental Protection Agency really need armed agents?

Outside of law enforcement, federal agencies now employ over 25,000 people as armed agents. They are more than guards. They’ve become like private armies that can push around private citizens.

Over 70 non-military federal agencies now have their own armed agents.

You expect armed agents with the FBI, the U.S. Marshal Service and the Border Patrol.

But the EPA? The Fish & Wildlife Service, Bureau of Land Management, even the Social Security Administration and the National Institutes of Health? Even the Department of Education and the Department of Housing and Urban Development have their own armed agents.

As do the Food and Drug Administration. And Veterans Affairs. Even the Government Printing Office and the National Zoo. And of course the Library of Congress

Collectively, over 25,000 individuals now work as armed agents of federal agencies not usually associated with law enforcement.

These are not just guards. These agents go out on raids to enforce the orders of federal bureaucracies. No bureaucracy should have a private army to enforce its orders against the American people.

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Ernest Istook
Ernest Istook shares insights from 25 years in public office, including 14 years as a U.S. Congressman, plus raising five children. He now writes for The Washington Times, hosts a talk radio show, and his daily commentaries are heard on over 100 radio stations. To receive Ernest's free newsletter, simply subscribe at Ernest also delved into issues as a Distinguished Fellow at The Heritage Foundation and a Fellow at Harvard University's Institute of Politics. As a former news reporter and courtroom attorney, he enjoys gathering and sharing ideas and information in an entertaining way. Follow Ernest on Twitter @Istook and on his website,

One Response to “Too Many Federal Agencies Have Created Their Own Private Armies” Subscribe

  1. ML NJ April 21, 2014 at 8:13 pm #

    And do they need weapons which citizens are not allowed to own?

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