Supreme scrutiny

The Heritage Foundation hosted a panel discussion this morning taking a look at the recent Supreme Courts term. Featured were Seth Waxman, the former Solicitor General of the United States under former President Clinton, Ronald Rotunda a constitutional treatise author, and Texas Solicitor General Ted Cruz. No one case dominated discussion but the issue of preemption and its reference to treatises were dominated by Waxman who believes the issue is “predicated on the supremacy clause.” Panelists also argued that the Supreme Court left many of the complicated opinions to states and lower courts. “They [The Supreme Court] leaves all the complicated problems to the lower courts, there’s no clear decisions sometimes,” said Rotunda. Rotunda believes that it is Justice Kennedy whose court opinions have left many “ambiguous” wordings that would only cause more problems for the lower courts. But with the recent decision to overturn the District of Columbia’s gun ban in the case of the District of Columbia vs. Heller, the question of the second amendment was front and center. According to Cruz, the case was fundamental to demonstrating that even in a modern society there is “right to bear arms.” But Cruz added that unlike Heller, most cases were not decided on a 5-4 vote, rather many cases came down to a 6-3 decision thus making this courts term less divided than years past, argued the panel.

The Heritage Foundation hosted a panel discussion this morning taking a look at the recent Supreme Courts term. Featured were Seth Waxman, the former Solicitor General of the United States under former President Clinton, Ronald Rotunda a constitutional treatise author, and Texas Solicitor General Ted Cruz. No one case dominated discussion but the issue of preemption and its reference to treatises were dominated by Waxman who believes the issue is “predicated on the supremacy clause.”

Panelists also argued that the Supreme Court left many of the complicated opinions to states and lower courts. “They [The Supreme Court] leaves all the complicated problems to the lower courts, there’s no clear decisions sometimes,” said Rotunda. Rotunda believes that it is Justice Kennedy whose court opinions have left many “ambiguous” wordings that would only cause more problems for the lower courts.

But with the recent decision to overturn the District of Columbia’s gun ban in the case of the District of Columbia vs. Heller, the question of the second amendment was front and center. According to Cruz, the case was fundamental to demonstrating that even in a modern society there is “right to bear arms.” But Cruz added that unlike Heller, most cases were not decided on a 5-4 vote, rather many cases came down to a 6-3 decision thus making this courts term less divided than years past, argued the panel.

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Wednesday, April 1

● FOIA suit seeks terrorists’ “hands off” list

● No tax break for “ark park”

● Physicians pick patients unevenly

● Drug ads promote unapproved use

● A candidate by any name is a candidate

● An apple a day keeps the baby away

LISTEN: The Day Ahead – April 1, 2015

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Iran celebrates Republic Day (without a nuclear deal) and Palestine’s membership in the International Criminal Court becomes official.

LISTEN: The World in 2:00 – March 31, 2015

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A big upset in Nigeria’s presidential elections, the Iranian nuclear deadline comes and goes and the U.S. releases its international climate commitments.

Obama Commutes 22 Drug Sentences, Double Over Entire Presidency

“Had they been sentenced under current laws and policies, many of these individuals would have already served their time and paid their debt to society,” a statement released by the White House reads.

Buhari Declared Victor In Nigerian Presidential Election

President Obama had issued a video message last Monday, urging the Nigerian people to shun violence, with the State Dept. congratulating the people of Nigeria “who exercised their civic duty by going to the polls.”

WH: Iran Talks Could Continue Past Tuesday Deadline

Echoing the White House, State spokeswoman Marie Harf said that ‎”we’ve made enough progress in the last days to merit staying until Wednesday. There are several difficult issues still remaining.”‎