Supreme scrutiny

The Heritage Foundation hosted a panel discussion this morning taking a look at the recent Supreme Courts term. Featured were Seth Waxman, the former Solicitor General of the United States under former President Clinton, Ronald Rotunda a constitutional treatise author, and Texas Solicitor General Ted Cruz. No one case dominated discussion but the issue of preemption and its reference to treatises were dominated by Waxman who believes the issue is “predicated on the supremacy clause.” Panelists also argued that the Supreme Court left many of the complicated opinions to states and lower courts. “They [The Supreme Court] leaves all the complicated problems to the lower courts, there’s no clear decisions sometimes,” said Rotunda. Rotunda believes that it is Justice Kennedy whose court opinions have left many “ambiguous” wordings that would only cause more problems for the lower courts. But with the recent decision to overturn the District of Columbia’s gun ban in the case of the District of Columbia vs. Heller, the question of the second amendment was front and center. According to Cruz, the case was fundamental to demonstrating that even in a modern society there is “right to bear arms.” But Cruz added that unlike Heller, most cases were not decided on a 5-4 vote, rather many cases came down to a 6-3 decision thus making this courts term less divided than years past, argued the panel.

The Heritage Foundation hosted a panel discussion this morning taking a look at the recent Supreme Courts term. Featured were Seth Waxman, the former Solicitor General of the United States under former President Clinton, Ronald Rotunda a constitutional treatise author, and Texas Solicitor General Ted Cruz. No one case dominated discussion but the issue of preemption and its reference to treatises were dominated by Waxman who believes the issue is “predicated on the supremacy clause.”

Panelists also argued that the Supreme Court left many of the complicated opinions to states and lower courts. “They [The Supreme Court] leaves all the complicated problems to the lower courts, there’s no clear decisions sometimes,” said Rotunda. Rotunda believes that it is Justice Kennedy whose court opinions have left many “ambiguous” wordings that would only cause more problems for the lower courts.

But with the recent decision to overturn the District of Columbia’s gun ban in the case of the District of Columbia vs. Heller, the question of the second amendment was front and center. According to Cruz, the case was fundamental to demonstrating that even in a modern society there is “right to bear arms.” But Cruz added that unlike Heller, most cases were not decided on a 5-4 vote, rather many cases came down to a 6-3 decision thus making this courts term less divided than years past, argued the panel.

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TRNS News Notes- 12/18

Obama: U.S. and Cuba: “New chapter”
Spies swapped for spies
Pols’ reax: Swift and strong
Biz groups support WH move
U.S. concludes North Korea hacked Sony

Nixon Announces Air Campaign, Gray Davis Reveals California Budget Problems, Congress Passes The 18th Amendment

Can you believe the year is almost over?

Click here for: Thursday, December 18

● Suit seeks refund from Sprint

● Blood sugar level linked to brain growth

● Terrorist support brings 15-year sentence

● Forest cops lose morale

● Internet policy on trading block

● Obama trips to fundraisers cost $1.2 million

LISTEN: The Day Ahead – December 18, 2014

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Ban Ki-moon heads to Ebola-affected West Africa, new data on average lifespans and the 100-year anniversary of the World War One “Christmas Truces”

Clinton Foundation Sets Focus On Those “Too Small To Fail”

TRNS interviews Patti Miller, the Director of the Clinton Foundation’s “Too Small to Fail” initiative.

McSally Wins Final House Seat

Photo/ Martha McSally For Congress

In a race that had been closely contested, McSally defeated the Democratic incumbent Rep. Ron Barber by margin of only 167 votes.