High Court Strikes Matching Funds For Publicly Financed Campaigns

In a 5-4 decision, the U.S. Supreme Court Monday struck down an Arizona law that provides matching funds to publicly-financed candidates when a privately-financed candidate, or third party groups supporting him, spend more money than the publicly-financed candidate was given.

Under the law, the publicly-financed candidate is given money to match the other candidate’s spending.

Writing for the majority, Chief Justice John Roberts said that providing funds to a candidate’s opponent is a burden on the political speech of the privately-financed candidate, and therefore the law violates the First Amendment. Unlike other laws the Supreme Court has struck down, the Arizona law directly gives money to candidates instead of raising contribution limits. This means that if a privately financed candidate raised $1,000 at a fundraiser, each of his opponents would receive $940.

Because a candidate would need to consider the benefit his opponents would receive before releasing a campaign ad, Roberts said, the system burdens political speech and is therefore unconstitutional.

Justice Elena Kagan, writing on behalf of herself and the Court’s liberal wing, pointed out that the Arizona scheme was passed by Arizona voters via referendum, and it was intended to combat real corruption in Arizona state offices.

She said that the law was an attempt to lessen the influence of big donors, and she noted that the initial grant of money was designed to be about as much as a candidate would likely need for a given race. Only if the privately financed candidate exceeded that amount would the other candidates receive additional money.

While Chief Justice Roberts called the scheme a “burden on political speech,” Kagan said that it “promotes the values underlying both the First Amendment and our entire Constitution by enhancing the opportunity for free political discussion.”

In his opinion, Roberts affirmed previous rulings which found that public financing “can further governmental interests, such as … preventing corruption,” but said that the Arizona law went too far.

The case was Arizona Free Enterprise Club v. Bennett.

About Jay Goodman Tamboli

View all posts by Jay Goodman Tamboli

US: No Evidence Of Direct Russian Involvement In Downed Plane

The U.S. officials however do claim that the Russian governments involvement in the Ukraine crisis had “created the conditions” of the tragedy.

McDonald Pledges To Reform VA, Wins Praise From Senate

“Today, the Department operates as loosely-connected individual administrations,” McDonald said. “Tomorrow, I hope the Department can be ‘one team one dream.’”

Pro-Israel Artists Install Makeshift Bomb Shelter On Capitol Hill

Artists 4 Israel wants you to know how it feels inside an Israeli bomb shelter.

Israel To UN: ‘No Nation Is Immune To The Threat Of Radical Islamist Terrorism’

Deputy Israeli Ambassador David Roet at the U.N. Security Council. July 22, 2014. Photo: Luke Vargas/TRNS

Deputy Ambassador warns Security Council that not supporting Israel’s fight against terrorism will ‘invite tyranny and terror into your own backyards.’

Senate Dems Attack Overseas Business Tax Codes

The Bring Jobs Home Act, which aims to close tax loopholes that favor companies that choose to move overseas, was blocked in the Senate last Saturday by a Republican filibuster.

Push To Legalize Marijuana In Oregon Advances To November Ballot

Photo/ Pavel Ševela / Wikimedia Commons

If approved, Oregon would join Washington and Colorado as the only two states to allow the use of recreational marijuana.