Obama Condemns Court’s Voting Rights Act Ruling

"Today’s decision invalidating one of its core provisions upsets decades of well-established practices that help make sure voting is fair, especially in places where voting discrimination has been historically prevalent."
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President Obama says he is “deeply disappointed with the Supreme Court’s decision today.”

Here’s the president’s full statement in response to the Court striking down Section 4 of the law, which lays out a formula that determines which areas of the country will have to go through additional review in order to make changes in their voting laws or perform redistricting:

I am deeply disappointed with the Supreme Court’s decision today.  For nearly 50 years, the Voting Rights Act – enacted and repeatedly renewed by wide bipartisan majorities in Congress – has helped secure the right to vote for millions of Americans. Today’s decision invalidating one of its core provisions upsets decades of well-established practices that help make sure voting is fair, especially in places where voting discrimination has been historically prevalent.

As a nation, we’ve made a great deal of progress towards guaranteeing every American the right to vote.  But, as the Supreme Court recognized, voting discrimination still exists.  And while today’s decision is a setback, it doesn’t represent the end of our efforts to end voting discrimination. I am calling on Congress to pass legislation to ensure every American has equal access to the polls. My Administration will continue to do everything in its power to ensure a fair and equal voting process.

The NAACP also lashed out against the Court’s decision:

The Supreme Court ruling takes the most powerful tool our nation has to defend minority voting rights out of commission,”Sherrilyn Ifill, the President and Director-Counsel of the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, said in a statement. “The Court has left millions of minority voters without the mechanism that has allowed them to stop voting discrimination before it occurs.

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